The Passover... When?

Commandment keeping believers should celebrate the Passover Service with the new covenant emblems of bread and wine no more than once a year; and then only at the divinely appointed time, which is the evening of the 14th Aviv, the first month in the sacred calendar.

 

Ye shall keep it (the Passover lamb) till the 14th day of the same month,
and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening.
(Exo.12:6)

The Passover Service, bear in mind, is a memorial service, a memorial of the Savior's death: and as such, it should not be celebrated at any and every time men may think fit. Just as it was the prerogative of the Almighty to decide when His Son would die on Calvary, it is also His decision as to when the memorial of His Son's death should be held. In His law He has expressly commanded His people to keep the Passover in the first month of the sacred calendar, the month of Aviv. Alas, some groups, observe the Passover Service (commonly known as Holy Communion) every week, or every month or every quarter. Some believers even go so far as to observe it twice a day! Confusion reigns; all because the express directions of YaHuWaH concerning the Passover are ignored.

This article, however, is not about how often the Passover Service should be observed; rather it is about WHEN it should be observed. The Bible tells us that the Passover service should be held on the evening of the 14th day of Aviv, the first month in the sacred calendar.

But some will ask:
            When is the evening of the 14th Aviv?
            Is it the end of the 13th Aviv?
            Or is it the end of the 14th Aviv?


These questions are not as odd as may first appear, because a day according to the scriptural way of reckoning begins and ends at sunset and not at midnight as in the popular civil calendar. Therefore the evening of the 14th Aviv could be taken to mean:

  1. The evening which begins the 14th Aviv; that is at the end of the 13th
  2. Or the evening which ends the 14th Aviv; that is the beginning of the 15th.

In Genesis chapter 1 the first style of reckoning is used, for the record reads:

The evening and the morning were the first day, ... the evening and the morning were the second day... the evening and the morning were the third day...


You will notice in that chapter that the 'evening,' the dark part of a day, came first: it started the day. The 'morning' then followed. It would be incorrect, however, to conclude that in Scripture this is the only style of reckoning a day; because elsewhere we note that the 'evening' of a day can also mean the 'end of the day.' For example in Leviticus 23:32 the specifications for the Day of Atonement (10th day of the 7th month) are given. Notice how the 10th day is said to begin at the even (end) of the 9th day.

It shall be unto you a Sabbath of rest, and ye shall afflict your souls
in the ninth day of the month at even,
from even unto even, shall ye celebrate your Sabbath

Obviously in this passage concerning the Day of Atonement (which is the 10th Ethanim) the phrase 'ninth day of the month at even' means the 'end' of the 9th day not its beginning. In other words the Day of Atonement begins in the evening (end) of the 9th day and continues to the evening (end) of the 10th day.

This style of reckoning the evening as the 'end of a day' differs from the one used in Genesis chapter 1. Another example where the evening of a day means its 'end' not its beginning is found in:

Exodus 12:18-19 In the first month, on the 14th day of the month at even ye shall eat unleavened bread, until the one and twentieth day of the month at even. Seven days there shall be no leaven found in your houses.

In this passage, like the one concerning the Day of Atonement, the term 'even' obviously refers to the end of the day and not to its beginning. Why obviously? The answer is, because the 21st Aviv is one of the days of unleavened bread. It is the last day of unleavened bread. It is a Feast day; so it must be included in that seven day count. The 'even' in this instance must therefore mean the end of 21st Aviv and not its beginning. Thus the seven days of unleavened bread are to begin at the evening or end of the 14th Aviv and continue in unbroken succession until the evening or end of the 21st Aviv.

If the word 'even' in this passage were taken to mean the beginning of the day, as reckoned in Genesis, then the seven days of unleavened bread would begin at the end of the 13th Aviv and terminate seven days later at the end of the 20th Aviv. This would effectively exclude the 21st Aviv as a day of unleavened bread: which is unacceptable; because we know from the Scripture quoted above and from Lev.23:6-8 that the 21st Aviv is the last day of unleavened bread; so it must be included in the seven day count. Therefore, to include the 21st Aviv in the seven day count, one must begin counting - as directed - from the end of the 14th Aviv. No other sensible conclusion is possible.

In view of these facts we may affirm that the 'evening of the 14th Aviv' is the end of that day; just as surely as we can affirm that the evening of the 9th day of the 7th month is the end of the 9th; and the evening of the 21st Aviv is the end of the 21st. The Passover service, in other words, should be held after the sunset which ends the 14th Aviv. This same evening ushers in the first day of unleavened bread. Here is further proof of this fact from the New Testament.

  • Matt.26:17: Now the first day of unleavened bread the disciples came to YAHUSHUA saying unto Him 'Where wilt thou that we prepare the Passover?
  • Mark 14:12 And the first day of unleavened bread when they killed the Passover.
  • Luke 22:7 Then came the day of unleavened bread, when the Passover must be killed.

These texts plainly state that the Savior and his disciples kept that memorable Passover on the evening which ushered in the first day of unleavened bread. Their actions verify the fact that the Passover service is kept at the evening or end of the 14th Aviv, because that is the evening which ushers in the first day of unleavened bread. The above texts could not possibly be referring to the end of the 13th Aviv.

In conclusion we may say: the Passover service should be held in the evening (end) of the 14th Aviv, just after the sunset which ushers in the first day of unleavened bread. This is the time the Savior kept it in obedience to His Father's Torah. We would do well to follow His example.

THE PASSOVER NIGHT

After the Passover Service, believers should observe the Passover Night, a night of prayer and vigil.

Exodus 12:42: It is a night to be much observed unto YaHuWaH for bringing them out from the land of Egypt: this is that night of YaHuWaH to be observed of all the children of Israel in their generations.

See a separate article concerning this.


PASSOVER IN THE SECOND MONTH


In exceptional circumstances the Passover Service you may be held on the 14th day of the second month. The passages which tell of this provision are Numbers 9:6-14; and 2 Chronicles 30: 2-15. See a separate article concerning this.

I end here trusting that YaHuWaH will bless you abundantly as you do His will by celebrating His festivals; bearing in mind at all times that each and every one commemorates His mightiest acts in the program of our salvation.

YAHUSHUA YaHuWaH Jesus Christ Elijah Isaiah Antichrist Baal Feast Atonement Passover New Moon Israel David God Angel Angels Glory King of Kings Devil Satan False Prophet Pope Miracle Sign Wonder Homosexual Abomination Solar Eclipse Armageddon End Times End of the Age Two Witnesses Aviv Barley Harvest Judgment  Nations Jerusalem Man of Sin Goliath Ark Noah Adam Eve Sodom Gomorrah GilGal Global Government World Leader Messiah Moshiach Moses Aaron Red Sea Elohim Heaven Earth Sun Stars Creator Lunar Eclipse Babylon the Great Islam Hebrew Lunar Tetrad Blood Moon Bethlehem Adonai Prince of Peace John the Baptist Tav Paleo Hebrew Sabbath Day Repent Covenant Daniel Belshazzar.

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